The Healer’s Choice Playlist/Soundtrack

I love music, but I usually don’t listen to it while I’m writing; I find my attention too divided. However, I often listen to music while I’m warming up for writing, and I get a lot of inspiration and energy from music at all times. I do a lot of prewriting and development in my head, with scenes playing out in my mind like my own private movies–and of course, movies have soundtracks. Some pieces of music seem like the perfect complement to the scenes, situations, and characters I imagine; occasionally a piece of music even inspires a scene or plot development. So, as many writers do, I have a playlist for my book; in my case, it’s like a soundtrack for the Healer’s Choice movie-in-my-mind.

After I first put the list together, I reconstructed it on YouTube, although I had to substitute in some pieces that weren’t available on that site. Here, now, is the original playlist/soundtrack with artist and album information; I’ve also indicated which scenes or characters I think the pieces go with, hopefully in a way that doesn’t give spoilers for readers who haven’t yet finished reading the novel. Most of the selections are available on iTunes or Amazon, but for independent musicians I’ve generally linked to CD Baby or Bandcamp, which in some cases are the only sources for their music. Happy listening, and if you like these songs, I hope you’ll support the artists who created them!

[opening credits] “Four Doors to Elfland” by Emerald Rose (Archives of Ages to Come

[healing] “Opening Om” by Celia (Sound Spirals) or “Ground, Center, and Shield” by Celia (For the Asking)

 [night journey] “Veli” by Hedningarna (Karelia Visa)

[the Sanctuary] “Hiraeth” by Carreg Lafar (Ysbryd Y Werin)

[Taras] “Branle des chevaux” by Stefano Pando (Lute Works)

[Corvalen] “Lady in Black” by Damh the Bard (Sabbat)

[heron flight] “Chant et danse (2 duduk et percussion)” by Jordi Savall (Istanbul)

[in the stars] “Fortune” by The Canadian Brass (English Renaissance Music)

[devotions] “Ispariz” by Irfan (The Eternal Return) 

[all is not well] “Ice Storm” by Alexander James Adams and S.J. Tucker (Ember Days) or “Para Barei” by Corvus Corax (Seikilos)

[apprentices] “Ahven” by Kardemimmit (Introducing Kardemimmit)

[the Kel Sharha] “The Caregiver’s Song” by Celia (For the Asking)

[confrontation/the Watcher of the Beeches] “Vinda” by Leaf (Lys) 

[news] “Cymbeline” by Loreena McKennitt (The Visit)

[prisoner] “Lady, We Must Flee” by S.J. Tucker (Ember Days)

[the Mothers] “Ancestor’s Song” by Kellianna (I Walk with the Goddess

[the colors of night and blood] “Viima (Cold Wind)” by Hedningarna (Karelia Visa)

[Rossen’s chase] “Polska” by Garmarna (Vedergällningen)

[homecoming] “Basse dance sur jouissance” by Stefano Pando (Lute Works

[mentor] “Night in That Land” by Nightnoise (Shadow of Time)

[procession] “Hymnus Apollon” by Corvus Corax (Seikilos)

[farewell] “Lisa Lan” by Carreg Lafar (Hyn)

[watching by the pyre] “Märk Hur Vår Skugga” by Pia Fridhill (My Swedish Songbook)

[the Council] “Sol” by Leaf (Lys)

[a daughter’s blessing] “Lullaby” by The Canadian Brass (English Renaissance Music)

[soldiers’ songs] “Wee Be Soldiers Three” by New World Renaissance Band (Where Beauty Moves and Wit Delights) or “Bache, Bene Venies” by Philip Pickett and the New London Consort (Sinners and Saints)

[the ford] “Krummi” by Valravn (Nordic Voyages)

[coming to terms] “Mieleni Alenevi” by Värttinä (Vihma)

[to the trees] “Robin Hood and the Tanner” by Richard Searles (Scarborough Faire)

[under the beech] “In All That Is Green” by S.J. Tucker (Ember Days

[sister and brother] “Peace” by Sarah Jarosz (Follow Me Down)

[treaty] “Closing Om” by Celia (Sound Spirals) or “Awaken” by Celia (Letting Go

[horses] “Rince Briotanach” by Clannad (Clannad 2)

[alone] “Dark Wings” by Wendy Rule (The Wolf Sky)

[the riverbank] “Afon yr Haf” by Carreg Lafar (Hyn)

[the Watchers] “Täss’on Nainen” by Hedningarna (Trä)

[to the Sanctuary] “Fram á Reginfjallaslóð” by Ragnheiður Gröndal (Þjóðlög)

[the House of Healing] “Corrente” (track 14) by Rolf Lislevand (Nuove Musiche) or “Sarabande” by Rolf Lislevand (Scaramanzia)

[swordplay] “Baba Yaga” by Annbjorg Lien (Baba Yaga) or “Luseblus” by String Sisters (String Sisters Live)

[the prince] “Scheidt: Galliard Battaglia” by The Eastman Brass Quintet (Renaissance Brass Music)

[sleepless] “The Window” by Wendy Rule (The Wolf Sky)

[playing and plotting] “La guerre” by Ensemble Clément Janequin (Janequin: La chasse)

[Rossen] “Where Are You Going” by Dave Matthews Band (Busted Stuff)

[riding circuit] “Kecharitomene” by Loreena McKennitt (An Ancient Muse)

[fight] “Chwedl y Ddwy Ddraig” by Calan (Dinas) or “Oro Se Vie” by Corvus Corax (Seikilos)

[Pieran] “Hey, Brother” by Avicii (True)

[spinning] “New Set” by Calan (Jonah)

[tribute] “Stella Splendens” by Philip Pickett and the New London Consort (Sinners and Saints)

[Healer, Listener, and Summoner] “Prayer of Intention” by Trinity Demask (Crucible

[harvest festival procession] “Walking the Labyrinth” by Celia (“Carry Me Home”) 

[ritual] “Gula Gula” by Mari Boine (Voices of the Real World)

[harvest festival dance] “Saltarello” by Dead Can Dance (Aion)

[harvest festival] “Lille Dansa” by Gjallarhorn (Sjofn)

[harvest festival] “Wine and Water” by Arthur Hinds (Tome of Mystery

[harvest gift] “Flamme” by Leaf (Lys)

[curse] “Tuuli” by Hedningarna (Trä)

[enmity] “Antiokia” by Garmarna (Vittrad)

[realizations] “I Can See Now” by Dead Can Dance (Toward the Within) or “Trecensis: Dum Pater Familias” by Philip Pickett and the New London Consort (Sinners and Saints)

[Treska] “Neidon Laulu” by Hedningarna (Karelia Visa)

[the Common] “Evolution” by Wendy Rule (The Wolf Sky)

[nightmare] “Brostnar Borgir” by Eivør Pálsdóttir (Krákan)

[new paths] “The Village Lanterne” by Blackmore’s Night (The Village Lanterne)

[closing credits] “The Mothers’ Land” by Arthur Hinds (Dance in the Fire

 

a prologue for The Healer’s Choice

At one point during the writing of The Healer’s Choice I was wrestling with some character issues and as a result wrote a short prologue. I ended up not using it (because I’m generally inclined to just jump right in and get the story rolling), although at one point in the book one of the characters does describe his memory of this event. The setting is Forstene City, about ten years before the beginning of the story proper.

Dursten glared at the column of armed men passing in review below—so far below that the sounds of hooves and harness and arms and orders blended in a single muddy music. Beside him on the balcony, his friend Torval shifted from foot to foot.

“Stop fidgeting, will you?”

“I can’t help it; it’s exciting! Don’t you think it’s exciting?”
“I would if we were going with them. I wish we were old enough. I ought to be leading that army, not watching it march out.”
“Don’t you think my uncle will do well in command?”
Dursten shrugged. “He’ll win glory, certainly. But it’s not his place; it’s mine.”
“It is his place; your father made him Lord Marshal.”
“The Celestials made me crown prince.”
A new voice brought the quarrel up short. “That is so, Your Highness.” The boys’ tutor joined them on the balcony and bowed to Dursten. “But they also made you too young to wage this particular war; there is no profit to you in denying or fighting that fact. However . . .”
“What?” That trailing word had pricked Dursten to a sense of expectation.
The tutor pursed his lips, as though a secret were trying to force its way out through them.
Torval, like the wolf on his family crest, was quick to sniff out the possibility of a savory tidbit. “You went up to the tower last night, didn’t you, Master? You saw something in the stars, something for Prince Dursten, didn’t you?”
“I wouldn’t like to say. . . .” He addressed Dursten. “It should really be for your royal father’s own Star Reader to interpret, and His Majesty’s decision—”
Dursten interrupted with a gesture that took in the army in the great courtyard below. “My royal father has other matters—great matters—on his mind. Besides, you’re my Star Reader, aren’t you? And my teacher. And my friend. Aren’t you?”
Indecision played over the tutor’s face. Then his gaze dropped. He was looking at the mourning sash Dursten wore in honor of his mother; Dursten could tell. And he could tell that the man was pitying him, even after all these months.
“Your Highness speaks true,” the tutor said. “And Torval has spoken truly as well—I did see something in the stars for you last night.”
“Well?”
“Your royal house, the Blood of Stennar, is dwindling, its numbers and its strength alike. But you, my prince, are marked for a great destiny: when you come to manhood, you will have the opportunity not only to restore but to surpass the glories of your great ancestors.”
Torval let out a whoop. “You can’t ask better than that, Dursten!”

The tutor nodded vigorously. “Indeed, Highness. So you see, you must stop yearning to ride to this war, and focus on preparing yourself for the deeds that lie ahead. For I have read it in the stars: The greatness of the king’s heir shall be known in every land this side of the sea.”